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CRUCIAL LIGAMENT RIP - Cruciate Ligament Surgery Vienna

The cruciate ligament is the central pillar of stability of the knee joint. The cruciate ligament makes the roll-slide mechanism of the knee possible at all. If a cruciate ligament tears (cruciate ligament rupture), this is very painful and the affected person usually has to expect long periods of absence. A cruciate ligament tear is a serious injury to the knee that can cause pain, swelling and instability. The cruciate ligaments are two strong bands of tissue that cross in the middle of the knee joint and help stabilize the joint. When these ligaments are torn, it can be difficult to walk or even stand. Cruciate ligament tears are most commonly caused by a sudden twisting motion of the knee joint or a direct blow to the knee. Treatment for an ACL tear usually includes surgery to repair the damage and physical therapy to restore strength and range of motion to the joint.

Cruciate ligament tears are one of the are the most common knee injuries, especially among athletes. This type of injury can range from a partial tear to a complete tear of the ligament. Symptoms of a torn cruciate ligament include pain, swelling and instability of the knee joint. In some cases, there may also be a cracking sound or sensation at the time of injury. Cruciate ligament tears are usually caused by a sudden twisting motion in the knee joint or a direct blow to the knee. Treatment for a torn ACL usually involves surgery to repair the damage and physical therapy to restore strength and range of motion to the joint.

Surgery (often called arthroscopy) is usually required to repair cruciate ligament tears. The aim of the surgery is to restore the stability of the knee joint. Physical therapy is an important part of the rehabilitation process after ACL surgery. The therapist will work with the patient to restore range of motion and strength to the knee joint. It is important to follow the therapist’s instructions carefully to avoid further injury and ensure a successful outcome.

A cruciate ligament tear can be a very serious injury. If you think you have torn your ACL, you should see a doctor as soon as possible. Early diagnosis and treatment can help reduce the risk of further damage and improve the chances of a successful recovery. A cruciate ligament tear is a serious injury to the knee that can cause pain, swelling and instability.

OVERVIEW

What is the cruciate ligament?

The cruciate ligament is a type of knee ligament. It is located in the knee joint and connects the thigh bone (femur) to the shin bone (tibia). The cruciate ligaments provide stability to the knee joint and prevent the femur from slipping off the tibia.

There are two cruciate ligaments in each knee: the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). The ACL is located in front of the PCL. Both cruciate ligaments cross in the middle of the knee joint and form an X-shape. In the case of a cruciate ligament tear, the anterior cruciate ligament is usually affected. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries usually occur when the knee joint is suddenly twisted or stretched beyond its normal range of motion. In the case of the posterior cruciate ligament, injuries usually occur as a result of a direct impact on the knee, such as in a car accident.

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Why are the cruciate ligaments important?

The anterior cruciate ligament and the posterior cruciate ligament provide stability to the knee joint. They are not only important for sports activities but also essential in everyday life. Therefore, timely treatment after the diagnosis of a cruciate ligament tear or other knee injuries is essential in order to return to one’s activities without restrictions.

Cruciate ligament rupture

A cruciate ligament rupture (ACL) is a serious injury to the knee that can cause significant pain and limitations. Most often it is the result of a sports accident, in sports such as soccer, handball, basketball, or skiing. However, there are other causes of a cruciate ligament tear, such as traffic accidents.

In the case of a cruciate ligament tear, a cruciate ligament in the knee is usually partially or completely torn. If a cruciate ligament tear is suspected, it is advisable to see a doctor as soon as possible in order to be able to act promptly.

Symptoms of cruciate ligament rupture

At the moment of the accident, the cruciate ligament rupture makes itself felt through severe, stabbing knee pain. Some patients describe this sensation as tearing or shifting of the knee. The discomfort becomes more pronounced as the damage progresses, but especially during exercise. In addition, the knee swells, which often restricts freedom of movement. Depending on whether the anterior or posterior cruciate ligament is affected, pain occurs in the respective region.

Because a cruciate ligament tear often damages smaller blood vessels as well, there is often a bruise in or around the joint. The knee feels wobbly and unstable. Not everyone affected with a cruciate ligament tear notices it immediately. Sometimes, based on gait instability and knee instability, it is concluded that a tear of the cruciate ligament has occurred.

Treatment usually involves cruciate ligament surgery to repair the damage, followed by rehabilitation to regain strength and range of motion. The prognosis after an ACL tear depends on many factors, but most people can expect a full recovery with the right treatment.

Because a cruciate ligament tear often damages smaller blood vessels as well, there is often a bruise in or around the joint. The knee feels wobbly and unstable. Not everyone affected by a cruciate ligament tear notices it immediately. Sometimes, based on gait instability and knee instability, it is concluded that a tear of the cruciate ligament has occurred.

Treatment usually involves surgery to repair the damage, followed by rehabilitation to regain strength and range of motion. The prognosis after an ACL tear depends on many factors, but most people can expect a full recovery with the right treatment.

Risk factors for cruciate ligament rupture

There are a number of stop-and-go sports that put you at risk of tearing your ACL. These include basketball, soccer and ice hockey. In these stop-and-go sports, players are constantly starting and stopping, which puts stress on the ligaments. This can lead to stretching or tearing of the ligaments. Players who participate in these sports should be aware of the risks and take precautions to avoid injury.

First aid for suspected cruciate ligament rupture

The PECH rule, as with other sports injuries, is useful to memorize first aid measures for suspected anterior cruciate (or posterior) ligament tears:

Treatment options for cruciate ligament injuries - Cruciate ligament surgery

What is cruciate ligament surgery?

Cruciate ligament surgery is a procedure to repair or replace the cruciate ligament in the knee after a cruciate ligament tear or rupture. The cruciate ligament is a strong band of tissue that connects the bones in the knee and helps stabilize the joint. It can tear due to injury or overuse – this is called a cruciate ligament tear. Cruciate ligament surgery is usually performed to relieve discomfort and restore function to the knee.

There are two main types of cruciate ligament surgery: open and arthroscopic. At the open surgery an incision is made in the skin above the knee to allow the surgeon to access the ligaments. At the arthroscopic surgery (arthroscopy) a small camera called an arthroscope is used to see the inside of the knee joint. The camera allows the surgeon to see the torn ligament and repair it with sutures or other tools. In some cases, a piece of tissue may be taken from another area of the body to replace the damaged ligament. Depending on the extent to which your cruciate ligament is damaged, your treating physician will suggest an appropriate method.

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Arthroscopic cruciate ligament surgery | cruciate ligament reconstruction | therapy for cruciate ligament rupture

How is the diagnosis of cruciate ligament surgery made?

Sports physicians, trauma surgeons and orthopedists are all specialists in the treatment of cruciate ligament tears and can therefore diagnose a necessary operation. First, the physician will ask questions about the accident and the patient’s current condition. The following aspects are clarified:

What preparations are necessary for cruciate ligament surgery?

Take advantage of the time before your cruciate ligament surgery! Certain exercises can help you avoid postoperative muscle atrophy (breakdown) and discomfort. You should not be discouraged by the wait for surgery, but rather let it inspire you. Particularly in the case of cruciate ligament reconstruction, in contrast to cruciate ligament suture, long waiting times until the operation are to be expected. So instead of moping around, prepare your body as best you can for surgery to minimize the recovery time that follows.

How long does recovery take after cruciate ligament surgery?

After a tear of the anterior or posterior cruciate ligament, a rehabilitation period of several months is required. This applies regardless of whether the cruciate ligament tear was treated by conservative treatment or surgery.

How long it takes to recover from ACL surgery depends on, among other things, how severe the injuries were before surgery and which ACL tendon was replaced. In addition, physical characteristics such as age and previous training also play a supporting role in recovery.

Is cruciate ligament surgery painful?

The operation of a cruciate ligament rupture itself is not painful, because the affected person is under general anesthesia. Pain after cruciate ligament surgery is normal for the first few weeks after the procedure. Pain after knee surgery can be caused by a number of factors, all of which apply to knee surgery in general. After certain surgical procedures on the cruciate ligament, additional discomfort may occur.

Can you still walk/run with a cruciate ligament tear?

Although the discomfort may subside somewhat after a few minutes following an accident, it usually worsens when the load is re-applied by single movements. When trying to walk, the knee feels wobbly. The joint can neither be stretched nor bent. Therefore, a timely medical history from an orthopedist or sports medicine specialist is essential!

Can you live with a torn cruciate ligament?

Man can be active even without anterior or posterior cruciate ligament live. The practice of several sports is also possible. However, research has shown that a knee joint without the support of the anterior or posterior cruciate ligaments is prone to early joint wear (osteoarthritis).

My treatment spectrum for an injury of the cruciate ligament

Restoration of the own cruciate ligament

If the cruciate ligament tears out near its attachment to the bone or together with a piece of bone, and without serious injury to the ligament itself, it can be reconstructed surgically. A full recovery is possible.

Augmentation of the cruciate ligament

It often happens that either the anterior straight or the posterior oblique part of the cruciate ligament tears and the other part holds. In this case, it is possible to strengthen the received part. One surgical option for treating a torn or ruptured ACL is augmentation. This involves attaching a piece of artificial tissue (graft) to the remaining healthy part of the ligament to support and stabilize the joint. Augmentation surgery can be performed with a variety of different graft materials, including:

The type of graft used depends on a number of factors, including the patient’s age, activity level and health status.

Cruciate ligament replacement with endogenous tendon

If the cruciate ligament is completely destroyed, the method of choice is complete replacement with the patient’s own tendons (semitendinosus, quadriceps or patellar tendon).

Singlebundle vs. Doublebundle

Normally, anatomical restoration using the single-bundle technique is effective. Here, not two tapes but one stronger one is used. In exceptional cases, both the anterior straight and posterior oblique cruciate ligaments are replaced – especially in patients with extreme athletic ambitions.

The cruciate ligaments are two strong bands of tissue that connect the femur to the tibia. They help to keep the knee stable. An injury to these ligaments is one of the most common reasons for knee surgery. There are two main types of cruciate ligament surgery: single-bundle and double-bundle. Ligament surgery repairs or replaces only one of the cruciate ligaments. This is the most common type of surgery. In double-bundle surgery, both cruciate ligaments are repaired or replaced. This type of surgery is less common, but may be recommended in some cases.

Both types of cruciate ligament surgery are complex procedures. The type of surgery that is best for you depends on many factors, including the severity of your injury and your overall health.

I will discuss all options with you and help you decide which type of surgery is best for you.

Transplantation of the cruciate ligament

Guidelines for the use of donor tissue have improved in recent years to the benefit of patients. As a result, transplantation is becoming increasingly popular. The advantage of this is that the procedure is much gentler, as there is no need to remove the body’s own vision. Rejection reactions are not to be feared and the stability achieved is as good or better than with autologous tissue.

Peripheral instabilities

In addition to the known structures within the knee joint, there are a number of other ligaments that provide additional stability. Injuries to these ligaments are also easily missed by physicians on MRI and then not appropriately incorporated into the overall surgical plan.